Performance, Scalability and Architecture

Andreas Grabner

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Related Topics: SharePoint Archiving Journal, Application Performance Management (APM), DevOps Journal

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Deployment Performance Health Checks By @GrabnerAndi | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Deployment related performance health problems that I always check when looking at a SharePoint Installation

Five SharePoint Deployment Performance Health Checks: Beyond Making Sure It's Running

In my first blog I wrote about SharePoint System Performance Health Checks beyond looking at CPU and Memory Metrics. In this blog, I cover deployment related performance health problems that I always check when looking at a SharePoint Installation. Especially after deploying new hardware, new sites, pages, views, custom or third-party Web Parts (e.g., from AvePoint, K2, Nintex, Metalogix, etc.) it's important to perform certain deployment sanity checks. While you may have nobody reporting issues in the moment there are several areas that you constantly need to check before they become a real problem.

Feel free to follow all my steps by either using your own tools or use Dynatrace Free Trial with our SharePoint FastPack.

Step #1: Optimize Connectivity Between Services
My first step is to analyze which components are involved when I navigate through SharePoint. Looking at the Transaction Flow (from Browser to Database) allows me to answer some key questions:

  • How much load is coming in and is that distributed correctly across my IIS Instances?
  • How many requests are actually making it to the SharePoint AppPools?
  • Which external services are we calling and how does that impact our response time?
  • Which databases are accessed and does that impact performance?

Transaction Flow allows me to understand how a request flows through the system, which servers, sites, databases and external services are involved and where there might be a bottleneck

Step #2: Resolve Any HTTP 4xx & 5xx
Often overlooked problems are deployment mistakes that lead to HTTP Errors. JavaScript files or images that are not correctly deployed can result in broken functionality on your SharePoint pages. Even though end users may not complain, these issues undermine design and negatively impact usability. Looking at your HTTP Response Codes allows you to understand which resources are currently not being correctly served.

Analyze which requests result in HTTP errors and therefore impact your end users. If they are deployment related, fix them before they impact too many of your users

Step #3: Eliminate Bad Web Parts
Third-party (e.g.,from AvePoint, K2, Nintex, Metalogix...) or custom developed Web Parts are heavily used in SharePoint installations. But what if they don't work because you miss a configuration setting or the deployment went wrong? I always do a sanity check by looking at:

  • Exceptions happening during loading of a Web Part assembly. This tells me I made a deployment mistake.
  • Exceptions happening during execution of a Web Part when a page gets rendered, as it typically indicates a configuration issue of the person that put that Web Part on that page
  • Web Parts that that have very long execution times consume a lot of CPU or Memory

When a Web Part is not correctly deployed SharePoint will throw exceptions like the one above, end users will only see a blank area

Configuration mistakes in Web Part settings can cause it to fail or run slow. Watch out for exceptions or slow executions triggered by Web Parts. Learn which page has this problem and fix it

For steps 4 & 5, click here for the full article

More Stories By Andreas Grabner

Andreas Grabner has been helping companies improve their application performance for 15+ years. He is a regular contributor within Web Performance and DevOps communities and a prolific speaker at user groups and conferences around the world. Reach him at @grabnerandi

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